Recipes

Cinnamon Spelt Biscuits

By Kate Walsh

Cinnamon Spelt Biscuits

Sometimes I just need to turn off the news and head into the kitchen. Today was one of those days. These are really simple little biscuits that are based on ones from The Clever Carrot who originally took the idea from ‘My Father’s Daughter’ by, Gwyneth Paltrow. They are vegan, tasty and really quick to make. Perfect to bake with little ones. Substitute 3/4 cup of the white spelt flour with oats for a different texture. You could also use walnuts or macadamias instead of almonds. 

INGREDIENTS

¾ cup almonds, toasted
1/3 cup sultanas
1 ½ cup white spelt flour
¾ cup whole spelt flour
2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
1 teaspoon baking powder
½ teaspoon fine sea salt
⅓ cup vegetable oil (I used macadamia)
⅓ cup maple syrup
⅓ cup rice malt syrup
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
1 overripe banana, mashed

METHOD

  1. Preheat your oven to 170C.
  2. Line two baking trays with baking paper.
  3. Toss the almonds into a food processor and blitz until they are roughly chopped.
  4. Remove half the almonds and process the rest until they are a finely ground.
  5. Place the sultanas in a bowl and cover with hot water to rehydrate them.
  6. Mix the finely ground almonds, flours, cinnamon, baking powder and salt in a large bowl
  7. Mix the oil, syrups, vanilla and banana together and then add to the dry ingredients
  8. Using a wooden spoon, mix well and then add the drained sultanas.
  9. Using your hands, make walnut sized balls and drop onto the baking sheets. Gently flatten.
  10. Cook for 15 minutes or until the are golden brown. 
  11. Brush with honey while still warm and transfer to a wire rack to cool.

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Berry Shrub

By Kate Walsh

Berry Shrub

A shrub is basically a vinegared fruit syrup. Sweet, tart and intensely refreshing, shrubs are the sophisticated older sibling of sweet cordials, enjoyed all around the world, and for good reason — they are delicious! You’ll find them in Southern USA where shrubs originated, to steamy South-East Asia, where they are spiked with sweet tropical fruits for instant relief from the humidity.
This shrub recipe can be used for all types of fruits — raspberries as I have here, or plums, peaches, pineapples and mangoes. Use whatever is in season and make sure the fruit is really ripe. I use regular white sugar, but you could substitute with raw sugar. When you first make it, the vinegar can be a little dominant, so leave the shrub in the fridge for a few weeks and let the flavours balance out.
Drink your shrub in a tall glass with lots of ice, soda water (club soda) and a jigger of gin.

Makes 1 x 750ml bottle

EQUIPMENT
glass or ceramic bowl
another bowl, lined with a sieve
wooden spoon
funnel
750ml bottle
ladle

INGREDIENTS
3 cups roughly chopped very ripe raspberries (or a mix of strawberries/raspberries/blueberries)
2 cups sugar
2 cups apple cider vinegar

METHOD
1. Mix the fruit and sugar: Put the berries in a glass or ceramic bowl. Pour the sugar over and leave for a few hours, or better still, overnight in the fridge. The sugar will slowly dissolve and draw out all the lovely juice in the berries. You’ll end up with a bowl full of soft berries surrounded by sweet syrup.
2. Strain and squish: Pour the mixture into a large sieve that is sitting over a bowl, to catch the syrup. Squish the berries with the back of a wooden spoon to extract as much juice as possible. Keep the sugared fruit pulp to serve over ice cream or Granola.
3. Add vinegar: Stir the vinegar into the strained fruit syrup. It will have a very strong vinegar taste at this stage, which is normal.
4. Pour and store: Fit a funnel into your bottle and ladle in the shrub. Seal and store in the fridge for a few weeks, after which the flavours will develop and the vinegar will mellow. You can of course drink it straight away, but you might want to add a little more sugar, as the vinegar will taste quite strong. It will keep in the fridge for up to three months.
5. Serve: To serve, one-quarter fill a glass with the syrup, top with soda water and garnish as you please.

Photo Credit: Anthea Williamson

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Natural Lemonade

By Kate Walsh

Natural Lemonade

This is the best lemonade you'll ever taste! Big call I know but learning this basic recipe will help you break up with the soft drink industry forever. Swap out lemon juice for orange or mandarin depending on the season and add turmeric or ginger for some zing. Some passionfruit and orange will give you an old school Passiona! The live whey ferments the juice/water and gives you a lovely natural carbonation whilst also giving you some good bugs for your tummy. Win!

Ingredients

1 cup lemon juice (around 4 lemons)
500gms natural organic yoghurt 
3/4 cup light tasting raw honey
1 tablespoon finely grated turmeric
filtered water

     Equipment

    1.25L swing top glass jar or PET bottle.
    Juicer (a hand juicer is fine)
    Strainer
    Bowl
    Tea towel or muslin
    Jug
    Water filter or access to filtered water

      Method

      1. Cut your lemons in half and juice, removing all the pips. To get 1 cup of juice, you will need around 4 lemons. Always juice lemons at room temperature as you’ll get more juice. 
      2. Line a strainer with a tea towel or two layers of muslin and place over a bowl to catch the whey. Add the yoghurt and draw up the edges of the towel and gently squeeze. You should easily get 1/4 cup liquid whey. 
      3. Place the lemon juice, 1/4 cup whey, turmeric and honey into a jug and mix with a spoon or whisk. 
      4. Pour into a swing top or PET bottle and top up with filtered water. 
      5. Put in the lid and leave on a bench out of direct sunlight for 2-3 days.
      6. If you are using a glass jar, make sure you open the lid each day to check each day how fizzy your lemonade is getting, especially if you are in a very warm climate. If you are using a PET bottle, you can feel how fizzy it is by pressing on the sides. The fizzier it gets, the harder the sides will feel. 
      7. The sweetness will reduce each day so when it is to your liking, place into the fridge. 
      8. Serve within 3-4 days with ice and mint. 

      PHOTO CREDIT: NELLY LE COMTE

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      Any Green Pesto

      By Kate Walsh

      Any Green Pesto

      After my weekly trip to the markets, I usually arrive home  with all manner of assorted greens. After years of enthusiastic (and slightly aspirational) buying followed by limp looking leaves by the end of the week, I now make a quick green pesto to make sure nothing goes to waste. Use whatever you have on hand and is cheap and in season - I've listed a few combos below. Trick is to have 2 cups greens, a handful of nuts, 1/2 cup oil and then add what you like to taste. 

      Asian inspired: 2 cups greens (kale, spinach, coriander), 1 tablespoon sesame oil, macadamia oil, one small chilli chopped finely and a handful of macadamias or cashews. 

      Mediterranean inspired: 2 cups greens (rocket, spinach, basil), a few anchovies, 1 tablespoon of capers, 1/2 cup olive oil, a handful nuts such as walnuts/toasted pinenuts/macadamias, 1/2 cup grated parmesan. 

      METHOD

      1. WASH: Make sure all your greens are nicely washed and dry. 

      2. BLEND: Add all your chosen ingredients to a blender and blend for around 1-2 mins or until you reach your desired consistency. I like it pretty chunky sometimes. 

      3. STORE: Place into a clean jar and pop the lid on. It should  last in the fridge for around 1 week. Top with olive or vegetable oil to stop it discolouring. 

      SERVING SUGGESTIONS

      Toast: perfect on a grilled cheese toastie.

      Pasta: toss through pasta with fresh cherry tomatoes and a smattering of freshly grated parmesan.

      Lamb: combine with some mashed salty fetta and serve with lamb chops and a big salad full of the same herbs you used. 

      Bowl: Fill a bowl with brown rice, freshly grilled tuna, nuts and  fresh greens. Tin the paste out with a little more oil and add some lemon juice for a super tasty dressing. 

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      Easy DIY Butter

      By Kate Walsh

      Easy DIY Butter

      Making butter with my 2 year old is one of my greatest joys. She is a serious butter fan so seeing the cream turn into butter is just the most magic of processes. Grab yourself a jar, a few marbles and some cream and before you know it, you'll be slathering homemade butter on your toast. I promise you it takes no more than 2 minutes. 

       

      INGREDIENTS

      1 x 1L mason jar or similar

      2-5 clean marbles

      250ml of the best cream you can find. 40% fat is what you are after. Avoid any cream with thickeners in it. 

       

      METHOD

      1. Pour the cream into the jar

      2. Add the marbles and close the lid

      3. Shake vigorously for around 3 minutes. The cream will thicken then start to separate into butter and buttermilk. 

      4. Keep shaking until you have a ball of butter in a puddle of buttermilk. 

      5. Drain the buttermilk into another jar and use in pancakes, smoothies or to make a cake. 

      6. Wash your hands in very cold water and then remove the butter from the jar and place in a cold bowl. Take out the marbles and then squeeze the butter to remove the last of the buttermilk. This is important as the remaining buttermilk will make the butter go rancid. 

      7. Add some salt while you are squeezing it. This is also the point where you can add herbs, garlic or spices. 

      8. Place either in a covered bowl and pop it into the fridge or wrap in baking paper and freeze for up to 3 months. 

       

       

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      Fermented Heirloom Carrots

      By Kate Walsh

      Fermented Heirloom Carrots

      I was in shock last night as my daughter wolfed down nearly the whole jar of these delicious heirloom fermented carrots. Well maybe not the whole jar but she made a good dent in it. Normally she won't touch a carrot, so these will now be on high rotation in my kitchen. These seriously take 10 mins to make and are delicious - crispy but with a much more complex flavour than a normal carrot. Make sure you taste them every day and pop them in the fridge when you think they are ready. I like them after around 6 days but it all depends on the weather. Serve alongside a roasted chook with salad, pop into a nourish bowl full of brown rice, seasonal greens and a big handful of herbs or eat straight from the jar like my little one does!

      Photo Credit: Luisa Brimble

      INGREDIENTS

      • 1 x 1L mason jar with lid
      • One to two bunches of dutch heirloom carrots
      • 1 tablespoon of high quality sea salt
      • 1L (or quart) of filtered water
      • optional: 1 tsp of whey
      • optional: a jar weight

      additional flavourings: one garlic clove, 1 tsp peppercorns, handful of fresh dill, 1 tsp mustard seeds, tsp fennel seeds

      METHOD

      Prepare the vegetables: Scrub the carrots and cut to fit snugly inside the jar. You can either cut them in rounds or leave them whole. If you cut them in rounds you might need two bunches. You can also use regular carrots if you can't find the heirloom ones. 

      Pack the jar: Place the carrots into the jar making sure they are really tightly packed. 

      Salt: Add the salt to the jar and any additional flavourings.

      Add water: Fill the jar with the filtered water until the carrots are submerged. It is important that the vegetables do not access oxygen during the fermentation process otherwise you will encourage bad moulds.

      Add weight: To ensure the vegetables are submerged, some people like to add a weight or a zip lock bag filled with water. I just ensure that the jar is very tightly packed and then there is less of a chance for the vegetables to rise above the water.

      Add whey: If you want to add the whey, do this now. Adding whey gives the fermentation a bit of a kick start but it isn’t essential.

      Leave to ferment: Screw on the lid and leave for 4-7 days at room temperature. After a day or two, you will notice the jar bubbling. This is perfect and exactly what you want. Open the jar every day to release the build up of the carbon dioxide bubbles. This is called burping and it guarantees that your jar will not explode so make sure you do it. Saying this, carrots won't bubble too much.

      Put in the fridge and enjoy: When you like the taste, put the jar in the fridge and it will last for up to two months if not more. 

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      Pear, Hazelnut & Ginger Granola

      By Kate Walsh

      Pear, Hazelnut & Ginger Granola
      Learning the simple art of making granola will wean you off supermarket breakfast cereals forever. And there is something so satisfying about the sweet smell of toasty granola fresh out of the oven. Making it is a regular ritual in my household, so there is always a huge jar of it in the pantry.

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      Crackers

      By Kate Walsh

      Crackers

      Walk into any deli and you’re almost guaranteed to be gobsmacked by the cost of good crackers. But don’t settle for the cheap cardboard-tasting ones from the supermarket – try these instead; they’re dead easy to make, the ingredients cost very little, and they taste so amazing you’ll never be tempted to buy crackers again. 

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